AW TOZER PDF BOOKS

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A list of free PDF books available on Christian living through the Online Christian Theological Virtual Library. Pursuit of God, A.W. Tozer (PDF Download). PDF Drive is your search engine for PDF files. As of today we have 78,, The Pursuit of God MAN - THE DWELLING PLACE OF GOD by A. W. Tozer. This book is a modest attempt to aid God's hungry children so to find Him. Nothing here is new candle at its flame. A. W. Tozer Chicago, Ill. June 16, .


Aw Tozer Pdf Books

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Download complete works of A. W. Tozer in pdf books format free. A.W. Tozer The message of this book does not grow out of these times but it is dutifully reprint their books and in due time these appear on the shelves of our . A.W. Tozer's books reflect a unique blend of genuine piety and downright common sense. He challenged every sort of spiritual pretension while evidencing a.

Author: A. Tozer Publication Date: Pages: There was a time, Tozer says, when Christianity exercised a dominant influence over the thinking of our forefathers, when they knew the world was a battlefield. They believed in sin, the devil, and hell as constituting one force pitted against the other force of God and righteousness and heaven. People today, however, think of the world, Tozer laments, not as a battleground, but as a playground; the world has become a place to frolic, not a place to fight.

Although Tozer sees the world as a battlefield, he sees it as one where the victory is certain.

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The two volumes of the Topical Reader are great for pastors, teachers and any layperson interested in pursuing God. A topical index is included. We are cajoled to rise above mere living, to press toward the blessings offered by the Holy Spirit. Christians often fail to reach beyond themselves to all that God has for them and to live in the extraordinary realm of close union with Christ.

From his meditation on Psalm to his reflections on Christian service throughout history, Tozer highlights examples of servanthood worthy of emulation. The chapters in this book are messages of concern, exposing the weaknesses of the church and denouncing compromise. Though they warn and exhort, they are messages of hope as well.

The Set of the Sail Author: A. Each essay is brief, thoughtful, sometimes bitter commentary on religious scene Christian walk. Use this as devotional, pick-me-up when life seems be closing in, a book reflection meditation. Some topics Tozer addresses are benefits of prayer, need for sanctified thinking, trying the spirits, and discipleship.

Tozer Publication Date: Pages: With a sympathetic heart and an objective mental approach, Tozer, in this short biography, gives us a sketch of the life of Albert Benjamin Simpson. Tozer reminds us that we have received from A. That ministry blossomed into The Christian and Missionary Alliance, a denomination characterized by its Christ-centered teaching and missionary emphasis.

He gives us an accurate description of unseemly religious and moral conditions and shows us where they are leading the church. In these forty-one essays Tozer tells us that God intends for truth to move us to moral action, that the Holy Spirit is working to bring the believer into a spiritual development that accords with the nature of the Heavenly Father, and that whatever keeps us from the Bible is our enemy no matter how seemingly harmless it appears to be.

It is then, Tozer explains, that the Holy Spirit can teach us the mystery of the triune God. David J. Fant, Jr. Perhaps that explains its power and the blessing that has rested on it. Tozer Publication Date: Pages: Here is that master of words at work again, speaking plainly of things that pertain to life and godliness. Compiled by Tozer's longtime friend, Harry Verploegh, these essays originally published in Alliance Life magazine are brief but eloquent affirmations of Christian orthodoxy.

Jaffray Author: A. Tozer Publication Date: Pages: Robert Jaffray was a missionary statesman of the early 20th century who turned his back on wealth and power to serve in China. He helped open French Indochina to The Christian and Missionary Alliance, an evangelical Protestant denomination that began as two separate organizations to promote a higher Christian life and to mobilize Christians in the work of foreign missionary efforts.

Jaffray stayed in Wuzhou, China for 35 years where his keen administrating, voluminous writing and incessant strategizing made him a natural leader. He was arrested in by the Japanese during WWII and was kept in internment camps until he died in from illness and malnutrition. Tozer Publication Date: Pages: Our world is fallen, sick and sinful, Tozer tells us, but God continues to call sinful people to repentance and salvation.

In this series of sermon excerpts, Tozer elaborates on the voices God uses: the witness of the Holy Spirit, the blood of Jesus, human conscience, reason, accountability, judgment, and, of course, love. Tozer on the Holy Spirit Author: A. Each one-page devotional incorporates Scripture for the day and is enhanced by supporting quotations by classical authors.

Tozer on the Almighty God Author: A. It takes more than a ballot to make a leader.

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In Book 1, Gerald B. Book 2 contains ten messages on the Holy Spirit. Book 3 has ten sermons from the Gospel of John and Book 4 has twelve essays on spiritual perfection. In Book 5, Gerald B. Book 6 contains twelve messages on well-known and favorite Bible texts.

Book 7 gives us twelve sermons relating to the life and ministry of the Christian Church and Book 8 presents ten sermons on the voices of God calling man. About A.

His family moved to Akron, Ohio, when he was just a young boy. At the age of 17, Tozer heard a street preacher, responded to the calling of Christ, and began his lifelong pursuit of God. How could anyone know that their conversion had been genuine?

A. W. Tozer

There was only one way — they continued steadfastly against serious opposition. To make converts today we play down the difficulties and play up the peace of mind and worldly success enjoyed by those who accept Christ.

The first believers turned to Christ with the full understanding that they were espousing an unpopular cause that could cost them everything. They knew they would henceforth be members of a hated minority group with life and liberty always in jeopardy. The Bible declares that God made man in His image. To know, man we must begin with God. The flaw in current evangelism lies in its humanistic approach — it is frankly fascinated by the great, noisy, aggressive world with its big names, its hero worship, its wealth and its garish pageantry.

Certainly no insurance company can offer half as much. In this quasi-Christian scheme of things God becomes the Aladdin lamp who does the bidding of everyone that will accept His Son and walk the aisle. The total obligation of the sinner is discharged when he accepts Christ. After that he has but to come with his basket and receive the religious equivalent of everything the world offers and enjoy it to the limit.

Those who have not accepted Christ must be content with this world, but the Christian gets this one with the one to come thrown in as a bonus. This concept of Christianity is in radical error. Invariably it begins with man and his needs and then looks around for God — true Christianity reveals God as searching for man to deliver him from his ambitions.

Always and always God must be first. The gospel puts the glory of God first and the salvation of man second. Anything that begins elsewhere is not NT Christianity. We must not forget that a man may attend church for a lifetime and be none the better for it. The writer to the Hebrews says that some professed Christians were marking time and getting nowhere spiritually. They had plenty of opportunity to grow, but they had not grown; they were still babes.

So he exhorted them to leave their meaningless religious activity and press on to perfection Heb It is possible to have motion without progress, and this describes much of the activity among Christians today. Activity that does not result in progress toward a goal is wasted, yet most Christians have no clear end toward which they are striving. On the endless religious merry-go-round they continue to waste time and energy. There is usually one of three causes for a lack of growth — ignorance of the Scriptures, unbelief or disobedience.

Tozer thinks most Christians are simply uninstructed. Just about any convert in the twentieth century was almost certainly told that he had but to take Jesus as his personal Savior and all would be well, that he now had eternal life and would most surely go to heaven when he died.

As such, the new convert finds himself with a hammer and a saw and no blueprint. He has not the remotest notion what he is supposed to build, so he settles down to the dull routine of polishing his tools once each Sunday and putting them back in their box. The instructed, obedient Christian will yield to God as the clay to the potter, and the result will not be waste, but glory everlasting. Since I have shared this material in the past using that title, I decided to continue using it on this website it is located under the "Spiritual Life Category".

These notions about God are many and varied, but they who hold them have one thing in common: they do not know God in personal experience. While admitting His existence they do not think of Him as knowable in the sense that we know things or people. They go through life trying to love an ideal and be loyal to a mere prin-ciple. What can all this mean except that we have within our hearts spiritual organs by means of which we can know God as certainly as we know material things through our familiar five senses.

The spiritual faculties of unregenerate men lie asleep in their nature, unused and for every purpose dead — they may be quickened to active life again by the operation of the Holy Spirit in regeneration. Faith enables our spiritual sense to function. Where faith is defective the result will be inward insensibility and numbness toward spiritual things. This is the condition of the vast majority of Christians.

The eternal world will come alive to us the moment we begin to reckon upon its reality. Reality is that which has existence; it does not depend upon the observer for its validity. God is real. He is real in the absolute and final sense that nothing else is; all other reality is contingent upon His. God has objective existence independent of and apart from any notions which we may have concerning Him.

The worshipping heart does not create its Object. Faith creates nothing; it simply reckons upon that which is already there. God and the spiritual world are real; we can reckon upon them with as much assurance as we reckon upon the familiar world around us. Spiritual things are there inviting our attention and challenging our trust. Our trouble is that we habitually think of the visible world as real and have doubts regarding the reality of any other world.

A. W. Tozer Books

We do not deny the existence of the spiritual world, but we have reservations about its realness. The world of sense intrudes upon our attention day and night — it is here, continually assaulting our five senses, demanding to be accepted as real and final. But sin has so clouded the lenses of our hearts that we cannot see that other reality, the City of God, shining around us.

At the root of the Christian life lies belief in the invisible. It parallels our familiar physical world, and the door between the two worlds are open to us. The soul has eyes with which to see and ears with which to hear; feeble they may be from long disuse, but by the life-giving touch of Christ alive now and capable of sharpest sight and most sensitive hearing.

As we begin to focus upon God the things of the Spirit will take shape before our eyes. Obedience to the word of Christ will bring an inward revelation of the Godhead Jn It will enable us to see God.

A new God-consciousness will seize upon us and we shall begin to taste and hear and inwardly feel the God who is our Life and our All.

More and more, as our faculties grow sharper and more sure, God will become to us the great All, and His Presence the glory and wonder of our lives. May this be your prayer — O God, quicken to life every power within me, that I may lay hold on eternal things.

Make heaven more real to me than any earthly thing has ever been. The cause of all our human miseries is a radical moral dislocation, an upset in our relation to God and to each other. At the Fall man adopted an altered attitude toward God, and in doing so he destroyed the proper Creator-creature relation in which, unknown to him, his true happiness lay. Essentially, salvation is the restoration of a right relation between man and his Creator.

A.W. Tozer Collection (57 vols.)

Much of our difficulty as seeking Christians stems from our unwillingness to take God as He is and adjust our lives accordingly. We insist upon trying to modify Him and to bring Him nearer to our own image. We must come to God on His terms and learn to love Him for what He is, and as we go on to know Him better we shall find it a source of unspeakable joy that God is just what He is.

As the self-existent One He gave being to all things, and all things exist out of Him and for Him; every soul belongs to God and exists by and for His pleasure. We owe Him every honor that it is in our power to give Him. Our everlasting grief lies in giving Him anything less. The pursuit of God will embrace the labor of bringing our total personality into conformity to His. We shall find ourselves out of adjustment to the ways of the world, and increasingly so as we make progress in the holy way.

Our break with the world will be the direct outcome of our changed relation to God. We must of necessity be servant to someone — either to God or to sin. The sinner prides himself on his independence, completely over-looking the fact that he is the weak slave of the sins that rule his members. The man who surrenders to Christ exchanges a cruel slave driver for a kind and gentle Master whose yoke is easy and whose burden is light. God was our original habitat and our hearts cannot but feel at home when they enter again that ancient and beautiful abode.

With them God can walk unhindered; toward them He can act like the God He is. In the Bible the offer of pardon on the part of God is conditioned upon intention to reform on the part of man.

In our current popular theology pardon depends upon faith alone. Now we recognize this as being the expression of a commendable revolt against the insipid and unscriptural doctrine of salvation by human effort. The converted man is both reformed and regenerated. And unless the sinner is willing to reform his way of living he will never know the inward experience of regeneration. This is the vital truth which has gotten lost under the leaves in popular evangelical theology.

It laid hold on the life and brought it under obedience to Christ. It took up its cross and followed along after Jesus with no intention of going back.

Such a faith as this does not perturb people — it comforts them. The Christian faith is not something a person can trifle with; it does not yield to experimentation; it commands or it will have nothing to do with a man. The only man who can be sure he has genuine faith is the one who has put himself in a position where he cannot go back.

Thou alone hast the words of eternal life. Many professing believers talk as if Christ were real and act as if He is not. Our actual position is always revealed by the way we act, not by the way we talk; thus the proof of our faith is revealed in our commitment to it.

Any other kind of belief is only a pseudo belief.

Pseudo faith always arranges a way out to serve in case God fails it. Real faith knows only one way — it is either God or total collapse. For each of us the time will surely come when we will have nothing but God.

Health and wealth and friends and hiding places will all be swept away and we shall have only God. To the man of pseudo faith that is a terrifying thought, but to the man of real faith it is one of the most comforting thoughts the heart can entertain.

Man appears to have a positive genius for twisting truth until it ceases to be truth and becomes downright falsehood. The doctrine that says a sinner may be saved by accepting Christ as Savior without yielding to Him as Lord has become an extremely popular position.

It is highly doubtful whether any man can be saved who comes to Christ for His help, but has no intention of obeying Him. This is the truth that has been twisted out of shape. I would like to offer the following comment here: obviously no one can come to Christ without an abiding faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; that is, a faith that fully rests in Christ.

A few generations ago the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer was neatly reduced by various Bible teachers to one thing: to impart power for service. The primary work of the Holy Spirit is to restore the lost soul to intimate fellowship with God through the washing of regeneration Jn ; ; Tit ; Ezek Though the Spirit surely desires to impart gifts and power for service, holiness and spiritual worship come first. God does not dwell passively in His people: He wills and works in them whatever His holy nature moves Him to do Phil When we fail to cooperate with the holy impulses of the in-living Spirit…when we go contrary to His will as it is revealed in the Scripture… we hinder His work by our willfulness and unbelief.

The contest between the indwelling Deity and our own fallen propensities occupies a large place in New Testament theology. Briefly, it is through a spiritual crucifixion with Christ followed by resurrection and an infusion of the Holy Spirit.

We are to learn what He wants us to be, and pray and work to prepare for Him a habitation. What kind of habitation pleases God? Each reveals deep, refreshing insight, conviction and originality of thought. Tozer had the gift of taking a spiritual truth and holding it up to the light so that, like a diamond, every facet was seen and admired. Tozer wrote with a passion that sprang up from a soul athirst for God.

This book was written with the prayer that it would lead many thirsty believers to the fountain of living waters. These are sermons that reveal how to let the Holy Spirit fill you and use you and change your life so that you become like Christ.

These are selections from the writings of Tozer meant to encourage, forewarn, and convict the believer so that he or she does not run the risk of becoming complacent.

This small volume focuses on the greatness of God and the honor due Him in worship. In it Tozer reminds us that we are here to be worshipers first and workers second. Is He the Lord or a symbol; is He in charge of the project or merely one of the crew?

These devotions, one for each day, are a distillation of the wisdom of Tozer gleaned in his lifelong pursuit of God; each is a profound call to worship and an opportunity for Christians to build their spiritual muscle.

The book includes a subject index and a scripture index. A companion to the first volume, this book continues the spiritual growth of the reader who makes it part of his daily worship. None of the selections here is repeated from volume one. The book also includes a subject index and a scripture index. Tozer here gives us ten lessons from the Gospel of John. Using the theme of faith as a springboard, Tozer explores how faith in God transforms the ordinary into something unimaginable.

Those familiar with Tozer will recognize his perceptive application of Scripture truths to real-life problems within the church. They will also learn to exercise a faith that believes in things beyond human understanding—things only possible with God.

Jesus is Victor! Instead of attempting to interpret the various events that occur in the text, Tozer looks at the underlying spiritual lessons. Many books on biblical eschatology have been written, but few speak to the central message of prophecy—repentance!

The chapters herein were originally published as editorials in Alliance Life magazine. In these forty-six essays, Tozer taps into the bedrock of true spirituality, addressing earthbound living while keeping heaven in view. No man has any right to counsel others who is not ready to hear and follow the counsel of the Lord. These concise and to-the-point quotes from Tozer are great for additions to sermons, church bulletins and church newspapers. They are also great reading on their own.

They were compiled in topical order by Harry Verploegh, a close friend of Mr. Here are more wise words with a prophetic edge from Tozer that have been compiled alphabetically by Mr.

These twelve chapters are from sermons based on First Peter. Tozer preached these at the Southside Alliance Church in Chicago. There was a time, Tozer says, when Christianity exercised a dominant influence over the thinking of our forefathers, when they knew the world was a battlefield. They believed in sin, the devil, and hell as constituting one force pitted against the other force of God and righteousness and heaven. People today, however, think of the world, Tozer laments, not as a battleground, but as a playground; the world has become a place to frolic, not a place to fight.

Although Tozer sees the world as a battlefield, he sees it as one where the victory is certain. The two volumes of the Topical Reader are great for pastors, teachers and any layperson interested in pursuing God. A topical index is included. We are cajoled to rise above mere living, to press toward the blessings offered by the Holy Spirit.

Christians often fail to reach beyond themselves to all that God has for them and to live in the extraordinary realm of close union with Christ. From his meditation on Psalm The chapters in this book are messages of concern, exposing the weaknesses of the church and denouncing compromise. Though they warn and exhort, they are messages of hope as well. These are essays selected from The Alliance Witness ,the magazine Tozer edited.

Each essay is brief, thoughtful, sometimes bitter commentary on religious scene Christian walk. Use this as devotional, pick-me-up when life seems be closing in, a book reflection meditation. Some topics Tozer addresses are benefits of prayer, need for sanctified thinking, trying the spirits, and discipleship. With a sympathetic heart and an objective mental approach, Tozer, in this short biography, gives us a sketch of the life of Albert Benjamin Simpson.

Tozer reminds us that we have received from A. That ministry blossomed into The Christian and Missionary Alliance, a denomination characterized by its Christ-centered teaching and missionary emphasis. He gives us an accurate description of unseemly religious and moral conditions and shows us where they are leading the church.

Compiled by Anita M.

In these forty-one essays Tozer tells us that God intends for truth to move us to moral action, that the Holy Spirit is working to bring the believer into a spiritual development that accords with the nature of the Heavenly Father, and that whatever keeps us from the Bible is our enemy no matter how seemingly harmless it appears to be.

It is then, Tozer explains, that the Holy Spirit can teach us the mystery of the triune God. David J. Fant, Jr. Perhaps that explains its power and the blessing that has rested on it.

Jonathan L. Here is that master of words at work again, speaking plainly of things that pertain to life and godliness. Compiled by Tozer's longtime friend, Harry Verploegh, these essays originally published in Alliance Life magazine are brief but eloquent affirmations of Christian orthodoxy. Robert Jaffray was a missionary statesman of the early 20th century who turned his back on wealth and power to serve in China. He helped open French Indochina to The Christian and Missionary Alliance , an evangelical Protestant denomination that began as two separate organizations to promote a higher Christian life and to mobilize Christians in the work of foreign missionary efforts.

Jaffray stayed in Wuzhou, China for 35 years where his keen administrating, voluminous writing and incessant strategizing made him a natural leader. He was arrested in by the Japanese during WWII and was kept in internment camps until he died in from illness and malnutrition. Our world is fallen, sick and sinful, Tozer tells us, but God continues to call sinful people to repentance and salvation.

In this series of sermon excerpts, Tozer elaborates on the voices God uses: These 38 essays chosen by Harry Verploegh were, as many other compilations, editorials Tozer wrote for the Alliance Life. Each one-page devotional incorporates Scripture for the day and is enhanced by supporting quotations by classical authors.

It takes more than a ballot to make a leader. In Book 1, Gerald B. Book 2 contains ten messages on the Holy Spirit. Book 3 has ten sermons from the Gospel of John and Book 4 has twelve essays on spiritual perfection. In Book 5, Gerald B. Book 6 contains twelve messages on well-known and favorite Bible texts. Book 7 gives us twelve sermons relating to the life and ministry of the Christian Church and Book 8 presents ten sermons on the voices of God calling man.

His family moved to Akron, Ohio, when he was just a young boy. At the age of 17, Tozer heard a street preacher, responded to the calling of Christ, and began his lifelong pursuit of God. He transferred to the Southside Alliance Church in Chicago in , and his ministry continued there for 31 years. In he became the editor of The Alliance Life magazine and served in that capacity until his death. Self-taught, with no formal Bible training, Tozer has been called a twentieth-century prophet within his own lifetime.

Through years of diligent study and constant prayer, he sought the mind of God. A master craftsman in the use of the English language, he was able to write in a simple, cogent style the principles of truth he had learned. Tozer moved to Toronto in and spent the final years of his life as the pastor of Avenue Road Church.Faith enables our spiritual sense to function. Today we need a return to a gentle dogmatism that smiles while it stands stubborn and firm on the Word of God that liveth and abideth forever.

We cannot afford to have less. If the cross has become to us a humdrum ornament to our faith, we have not understood it, and we have not felt its offense. One such notion is that God always answers prayer — either by saying Yes or by saying No, or by substituting something else for the desired favor.